Home

The Montgomery County A&M Club was created to assist
Texas A&M University and the
Association of Former Students in any worthy undertaking to the best of our ability; to promote fellowship among all Aggies, Aggie families and friends of Texas A&M University, and to encourage  and promote networking among alumni to gain experience in their career field and grow with their community.

Events and Social Media

Coming Up!

Saturday, September 7, 2019 @ 2:30 – TAMU vs Clemson Watch Party @ Papa’s Ice House & Grill (314 {Pruitt Rd., Spring TX)

Saturday, September 28, 2019 TBD – TAMU vs Arkansas Watch Party @ Papa’s Ice House & Grill (314 Pruitt Rd., Spring, TX)

Saturday, October 19, 2019 TBD- TAMU vs Ole Miss Watch Party @ Papa’s Ice House & Grill (314 Pruitt Rd. Spring, TX)

Saturday, November 23, 2019 TBD – TAMU vs Georgia Watch Party @ Papa’s Ice House & Grill (314 Pruitt Rd. Spring, TX)

Saturday, November 30, 2019 @ 2:30pm – TAMU vs LSU Watch Party @ Papa’s Ice House & Grill (314 Pruitt Rd. Spring, TX)

Looking to get involved check out our Facebook below feed below!

Montgomery County A&M Club

The Montgomery County A&M Club serves to promote fellowship among Aggies, Aggie families and friends of Texas A&M University.
Montgomery County A&M Club
Montgomery County A&M Club shared a post.
WAKE UP IT'S GAME DAY! The #17 Aggies face #8 Auburn today at Kyle Field at 2:30 p.m. (CT). WHOOP! 👍
Montgomery County A&M Club
Montgomery County A&M Club is at Papa's Ice House.
Cheering on our Aggies against Clemson!
Montgomery County A&M Club
Montgomery County A&M Club shared a post.
ORIGIN OF THE CENTURY TREE. When the brand new A&M College opened in 1876, there were a few native trees growing on campus. Over the next few years, most of those native trees were consumed as firewood to heat the buildings during the winters - leaving the campus a desolate grassland. The administrators recognized the need to repopulate the campus with trees. But nobody had a clue which species of tree would grow well in the campus soil and climate. From the mid-1880s through the early 1890s, the Horticulture Department at the college - under the direction of Dr. E.J. Kyle (yes, that Kyle) - planted over 70 species of test trees in the area around Old Main. For about 18 years, the horticulture students cared for and monitored the growth of those test trees. In 1907, an official report was published which detailed the specific results of each of those 70+ test tree species. The LIVE OAK was chosen as the best tree species to plant on campus because of the prolific growth of the live oak test tree which was planted in 1891 as an 18-inch tall seedling just to the northwest of Old Main. Old Main burned in 1912 and was replaced by the Academic Building in 1914. The live oak test tree - planted at the same exact time that former Texas Governor Lawrence Sullivan Ross became the new president of the college - survived the burning of Old Main and the construction of the Academic Building. We know that live oak test tree today as the Century Tree. And due to its selection back in 1907, over 80% of the 11,000 trees on the Texas A&M campus today are live oaks. This photo (courtesy of the Cushing Library) shows the 16-year old live oak test tree in 1907 - just to the northwest of Old Main - where it still grows today. The Century Tree is now 129 years old and is in excellent health. Live oaks are long-lived trees known to grow for 600 years or more. Gig 'em!

Other events that go on throughout the year
Muster


Feed the Ross Volunteers before the Go Texan Parade


Scholarship Golf Tournament

Back to School Picnic

Watch parties for Aggie Football Away Games

Looking to get more plugged in Check out other groups in our County bringing Aggies together!

Montgomery County Aggie Moms Club – Aggie Moms networking group
Reveille Networking Group – Networking that meets Friday Mornings in the Woodlands
Woodlands Happy Hour – Houston A&M club happy hour in the Woodlands